Poster Details

Poster # 5

EXPANDING ACCESS TO GENETIC COUNSELING AND TESTING DURING A GLOBAL PANDEMIC USING VIRTUAL TOOLS

Authors: Deepa Sheth MD, UChicago; Sarah Bazzetta PA-C1, UChicago; Rebecca Zeidman, CCOM; Arnaaz Khwaja, UChicago; Olivia Vizzini, UChicago


PRESENTER’S INFO:
Name: Olivia Vizzini
Email: ovizzini@uchicago.edu
Title: Student
Affiliation: UChicago
Department: Radiology
Advisor: Sarah Bazzetta
Advisor’s Email: sbazzetta@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu

NOTE: This poster will also be presented during the symposium Twitter Poster Session on the day of the symposium, Friday, October 30 between 9:00 – 11:30 AM (CT). Twitter posters will be available all day for viewing and interactive discussions. Posters will remain viewable on Twitter through the weekend from October 31-November 1.

Twitter Handle: @PA_SarahB


Abstract:
Background: The USPSTF recommends risk assessment by primary care clinicians for all women with personal or family history of breast, ovarian, tubal or peritoneal cancers (Grade B). In the current pandemic environment, the continued need to provide comprehensive preventive care services while ensuring social distancing and patient safety presents unique challenges for providers and hospitals, which traditionally used waiting room time and paper questionnaires to complete this screening.

Methods: In this pilot study, clinicians took a multi-disciplinary, electronic approach to identify high risk patients, increase awareness and expand access to genetic testing for patients across the hospital system through the centralized schedule for mammograms. Eligible patients based on the online family history tool were given the opportunity to complete a virtual genetic consultation and have a saliva kit shipped direct to their home. This project was formally determined to be quality improvement (QI), not human subjects research, and was therefore not overseen by the IRB, per institutional policy. Patients were identified based upon current NCCN criteria for HBOC and Lynch syndromes.

Results: Of the 451 patients invited to complete the online tool, 31% of the patients who completed the online tool qualified for genetic testing, including 29% of black patients and 35% white patients. When comparing patients’ self-reported family history to that reported in EPIC, 50% of the patients had more information in the self-reported online tool than had previously been included in their EMR.

Conclusion: Online tools can help to efficiently and effectively identify high-risk patients based on NCCN guidelines. More research is needed to address the barriers identified, including increasing access to technology for minority patients and increasing awareness of how genetics and risk assessment can supplement annual mammograms to further personalize preventive…[text cut off]


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